Enjoy a Fabulous Jungle and Beach Vacation in Belize This Summer

Belize is a small Caribbean nation sandwiched between Guatemala and Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula but the country has been blessed with fabulous weather and incredibly diverse natural landscapes. Ranging from unfathomably beautiful tropical islands in the east to lush jungles, majestic waterfalls, and pristine rivers in the west, Belize truly has something for everyone.

The best way to see and experience all the best that Belize has to offer is with a jungle and beach vacation package from Chabil Mar. You can choose from exciting offshore activities like fishing, snorkeling, sailing, and scuba diving the islands and atolls of the Belize Barrier Reef and mix it with adventures on the mainland, including hiking through vast, trackless rainforests, zip lining through the jungle canopy, and exploring ancient ruins left behind by the Maya more than 1,000 years ago.

Belize’s small size makes enjoying a day out on the water one day followed by an exciting tour of the mainland the next simple and easy. Some beach and jungle packages offered by Chabil Mar include staying at the famous Caves Branch Lodge, home to five-star luxury tree houses and exciting nighttime explorations of the jungle.

Other options include heading to the heart of Belize’s western Cayo District and staying at The Lodge at Chaa Creek while enjoying trips to see butterfly farms and exploring ATM Cave, rated by the Discovery Channel as the number one sacred cave in the world. You can also choose to visit the gorgeous Gaia River Lodge located in the heart of the vast Mountain Pine Ridge Forest Reserve where you’ll get a chance to see the tallest waterfalls in Central America.

Chabil Mar is a multiple award-winning luxury resort located right on the golden sands of the Placencia Peninsula in southern Belize. For the beach portion of your vacation, you can choose from sea kayaks to explore the nearby islands, boat safari trips up the pristine Monkey River (where yes, you will definitely see plenty of monkeys), and hiking tours of the Cockscomb Basin Nature Preserve, home to all five of Central America’s big cat species, including jaguars.

Chabil Mar’s jungle and beach vacation packages have everything you’ll need to enjoy an unforgettable vacation in Belize. Packages include transportation, accommodations at Chabil Mar as well as a partner jungle resort, exciting tours, meals, and other exciting amenities like professional massages, special nature events, and complimentary use of all of the resorts’ facilities.

Visit our website chabilmarvillas.com for more information on Belize, and don’t hesitate to send us an email, or call US/CAN Toll Free: 1-866-417-2377, Local: (011-501) 523-3606, if you have questions or need help in planning a Belize vacation.

 

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Belize to Celebrate 38 Years of Independence in September

On September 21, 2019, Belize will celebrate 38 years of independence. After centuries as a British colony, Belize became a fully sovereign nation on September 21, 1981, and is today a proud member of the British Commonwealth.

Each year, Belize holds a nationwide contest to choose a theme for the Independence Day celebrations. This year, the winning theme chosen was, “From Maya Grandeur to Modern Glory, Together Let’s Shape the Belizean Story” as a way to both honor the country’s heritage as well as inspire Belizeans towards an even greater future.

September is widely known as “Patriotic Month” in Belize as it is when several key national holidays happen. On September 10, Belizeans celebrate The Battle of St. George’s Caye Day to celebrate a key naval victory by English colonists over a Spanish fleet offshore of the island of St. George’s Caye (islands are called “cayes” in Belize) in 1798. Prior to that date, the British and Spanish had vied for control of the rich logging resources in Belize, but the Battle of St. George’s Caye ensured that Belize would become the only English-speaking colony in Central America.

September is a time when Belizeans from all over the world return home to celebrate the patriotic holidays with friends and family. The streets of every town and village are bedecked in the national colors of red, white, and blue, and each locality holds parades, street dances, musical concerts, and other events. The radio stations play patriotic songs, and there are recitations of patriotic poems and other stirring reminders of the glorious history of Belize.

Falling during the “low season,” September is one of the best times to visit Belize. Travelers can benefit from reduced fares on lodging and organized tours, and there is a lot to see and do all across the country. The weather is almost always cooperative, with trees and flowers blooming seemingly in patriotic support of the historic events that are celebrated all month long. And the September 21 Independence Day festival always culminate in tremendous fireworks shows that simply shouldn’t be missed.

“September really is a great time to visit Belize,” said Larry France, the marketing manager of Chabil Mar. “Everyone is in a great mood due to the patriotic holidays, and it’s really a great time to see parades, street dancing, fairs, and other exciting events.”

Chabil Mar, a luxury resort located on the Caribbean shores of the Placencia Peninsula in southern Belize, is the perfect place to stay for travelers visiting the country in September.

What It’s Really Like To Dive The Great Blue Hole

The Mysterious Belize Great Blue Hole is a large underwater hole off the coast of Belize. It lies near the center of Lighthouse Reef, a small atoll 100 kilometers (62 mi) from the mainland and Belize City. The hole is perfectly circular in shape, over 300 meters (1000 ft) across, 3140 feet circumference and 125 meters (410 ft) deep.

Read also: Dive the Great Blue Hole of Belize with this Vacation Package

It was formed as a limestone cave system during the last glacial period when the sea level was 400 to 500 feet below present time and was dry land. Last glacial period began about 120,000 years ago and end about 15,000 years ago. Reaching the maximum extension 26,500 years ago. At the end the ocean began to rise, the caves flooded, and the roof collapsed.

Believed to be the world’s largest feature of its kind, the Great Blue Hole is part of the larger Belize Barrier Reef Reserve System, a World Heritage site of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO).

The hole itself is the opening to a system of caves and passageway that penetrate this undersea mountain. In various places, massive limestone stalactites hang down from what was once the ceiling of air-filled caves thousand of years before the end of the last Ice Age 15,000 years ago. When the ice melted the sea level rose, flooding the caves. This process occurred in stages. Evidence for this are the shelves and ledges, carved into the limestone by the sea, which run the complete interior circumference of the Blue Hole at various depths.

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The Blue Hole is a “karst- eroded sinkhole.” It was once a cave at the center of an underground tunnel complex whose ceiling collapsed. Some of the tunnels are thought to be linked right through to the mainland, though this has never been conclusively proved. Notable are the large population of sharks such as lemon, black tip, reef, hammerhead, and bull sharks.
Mysterious and legends always have been around the Belize Blue Hole.

Read also: Scuba Dive the Great Belize Barrier Reef with this Vacation Package

This was the entrance to Xibalba?. It’s the kind of underwater geology that inspires speculation about aliens creating geometrically perfect anomalies, mermaids and monsters living in darkness.

I explored the bottom of the Blue Hole perimeter (3,140 feet circumference). To do this I dove down twice, reaching the depth of 375′ feet which took 4 to 5 hours of diving each day.
Video Music:
Start to 2:18 min. “Dawn From Four Sea Interludes” by Benjamin Britten
2:18 to 4:37 min. “300 Violin Orchestra” by Jorge Quintero
4:37 to End “Groove Armada” from Tomb Raider Soundtrack

Video and Blog courtesy of Ramon Llaneza

How To Build A Palapa‎

If you took a helicopter ride over Belize’s lush mainland and cayes, you might notice what looks like Hawaiian hula skirts fanned out into circles on the ground below. Upon closer inspection, you’ll discover that those circles are actually skillfully-woven roofs made of palm fronds that are so tightly wrapped, layered and interfaced, rains can pour down but anyone standing beneath this umbrella of vegetation will stay dry.

These thick umbrellas—known as a palapas—are part of the beauty and history that is Belize, and if you’d like to see some of the most beautiful ones, visit Chabil Mar Resort, an award-winning all-inclusive resort located in Placencia where the art of the palapa has been taken to new heights.

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At the end of the resort’s long pier stands a serene palapa that invites guests to relax and de-stress (see pic above). Not far away is Chabil Mar’s other palapa: it tops a gathering place considered the epicenter of Chabil Mar Resort’s social scene. Finding a seat at the Kaleidoscope Bar & Lounge (see pic below) isn’t easy as the night moves on and stars come out, so get out from under the bar’s palapa if you want to see them!

placencia belize restaurants
Why are palapas frequently a part of Belize’s landscape? Because they represent history and the clever use of natural resources, pairing tropical charm with practicality: Mayan settlers built thatch-roofed huts thousands of years ago for shelter and to this day, their ancestors still craft them. If you’d like to follow in their footsteps, our instructions can help. Chances are, you’ll finish faster than they did since you’ve probably got some nice tools!

1. Acquire five bamboo poles—four poles of equal height that are tall enough for people to stand under, and one that’s at least 12-inches longer for the center. Use a table saw to trim one or more to make lengths uniform.

2. Decide where to build your palapa. Dig a post hole in the center of that area. Next, dig four post holes at equal distances from the center pole and from each other. They should be at least 6- to 8-feet apart.

3. Follow package instructions to mix cement with water so it resembles thin pudding. Fill each post hole half-way with cement mix. Use a large funnel to direct the liquid cement into the holes.

4. Put one pole into each hole and then verify all heights to be certain they’re uniform; make adjustments before the cement sets if necessary. Fill each hole to the top with the remaining cement mix.

5. Craft makeshift supports of scrap wood to brace the poles. You can nail or screw one to the bamboo if necessary. Use mounds of earth to brace other scrap wood so poles don’t budge while the cement hardens. Wait at least 24-hours before removing supports.

6. Make a frame. Measure the distances between the outer four poles. Cut lumber to size and attach them to form a square. Next, measure the distance from the four outer poles to the center. Cut wood to size and attach with screws. When you look up at the finished frame, you should see spokes radiating to the center.

7. Cover the frame with pre-cut sections of plywood so there’s a solid base for attaching palm fronds.

8. Use an industrial stapler to attach palm fronds, starting at the outer edges and moving into the center by fastening layer upon layer of fronds. Work in a circle. As space decreases, you may have to cross, weave or prune fronds for a good fit. The overlap should be so solid, you can’t see an inch of frame or plywood.

9. Hold a palapa-warming party. Invite friends and neighbors over for tropical drinks beneath your work of art.

Visit our website chabilmarvillas.com for more information about Belize, and don’t hesitate to send us an email, or call US/CAN Toll Free: 1-866-417-2377, Local: (011-501) 523-3606, if you have questions or need help in planning a Belize vacation.

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Belize Archaeological Dig Proves Climate Change and Migration Are Nothing New!

 

Nim-Li-Punit-Maya-Site

Archaeologists find signs in Belize that climate change and migration are inexorably intertwined.

There’s no denying it: Strange and sometimes catastrophic weather experienced around the globe is making a solid case for climate change. While Central America has stayed out of the news as headlines focus on diminishing Polar ice caps and catastrophic melting in Greenland, breaking news from Belize is just beginning to grab the world’s attention: Archaeologists are proving that migration and climate change go together.

What exactly has grabbed the attention of climatologists, archaeologists, and historians? New Belize digs that have unearthed some of this hemisphere’s earliest tools, each of which contributes to a growing body of research that Mesoamericans experienced climate change that leads to southern migration patterns. In fact, a close collaboration between project social scientists and local Maya communities (whose ancestors created these tools many centuries ago) is one of the most interesting aspects of this project.

According to the publication Science Daily, University of New Mexico (UNM) teams, working in Belize’s Bladen Nature Reserve, recently found “some of the earliest stone tools ever used in southern Mesoamerica.” These tools are evidence that “waves of immigrants” from the north, responding to ice age encroachment, fled south around 13,000 years ago, bringing with them stone tools necessary to help them adapt to warmer surroundings.

“Popular Archaeology” editors were so impressed by this news, details, and photos of students working on the Belize dig were featured on the front page of their September 2019 issue. They quote dig principle, UNM Anthropology Professor Keith Prufer, with saying that “This is an area of research for which we have very poor data regarding early humans.” This project is likely to add substantive evidence to that void.

What contemporary lessons can we learn from this project’s ongoing discoveries? That human beings are amazingly adaptable. When climate change made inhabited areas unlivable, people were clever and creative enough to see the signs, adapt their lifestyles and undertake migrations that were likely arduous and dangerous. But the will to survive proved stronger than changing weather patterns.

If your interest is piqued by this fascinating project and you’re interested in seeing why Belize is fast becoming a leader in Western Hemisphere archaeological research, you’ll need accommodations to sustain you during your own investigative journey. Chabil Mar not only offers luxurious lodgings, a gourmet onsite restaurant and Belize vacation packages, but as the only full-service resort on the Placencia Peninsula, guests can arrange for archaeological tours guaranteed to satisfy everyone’s curiosity.

Shoulder season rates remain in effect until December 19th, so you may even save money while you delve into the past. As news of these discoveries spread, Belize anticipates a tourism spike, so you’re advised to book your villa as early as possible in order to see for yourself what the scientific world is talking about!

Visit our website chabilmarvillas.com for more information on Belize, and don’t hesitate to send us an email, or call US/CAN Toll Free: 1-866-417-2377, Local: (011-501) 523-3606, if you have questions or need help in planning a Belize vacation.

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